25 de junio de 2011

Si fuera griego, también protestaría

Al menos, eso opina Simon Jenkins, el extraordinario columnista de The Guardian en una reciente aportación editorial (aquí la encuentras).

Aquí algunos párrafos interesantes.

...I would not hesitate. I would take to the streets... Eurozone bankers have been lending the Greeks loads of money for years, knowing they could not repay and assuming Europe's taxpayers would come to the rescue...

...Closer European union, so called, was a bad idea for precisely the reason now seen on the streets of Athens. It was an attempt by a supranational economic authority to supersede national democracy. Bluntly, it assumed the commercial culture of "greater Germany" could be imposed on a wide variety of cultures by virtue of geographical propinquity. Countries with a high propensity to work and save would discipline those with a lower one. Banks would finance it all. It was fantasy born of utopia...

...Europe's paymasters can huff and puff, just as Greece's politicians can pledge and promise, but come the July meeting of the eurozone financiers, they will do what the politics of the moment demands, which is to keep the money flowing down Europe's arteries into Greece's bank balances. Europe will pay and Greece will again be off the hook...

..The Greek predicament is a system failure. Democracy works only where accountability bites, where taxing and spending within a given timeframe are related to voting for party representatives...

...The EU has become so constitutionally flawed that few of its states dare put continued membership to referendum. The lesson is clear. Sovereign states with distinct political cultures should never surrender control over internal affairs to foreign agencies unless their people are amenable to such a loss of autonomy. Greeks eagerly joined the EU and the euro because they thought there was money in it. They were absolutely right. Why should anyone reject 30 years of such gift horses when others are paying?


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